Section 106 Historic Review- Jackson Park- OPC Mobility review for South Lakefront Plan 2017-18 (Environmental Review)

Return to Jackson Park/JPAC home in hydepark.org. PAC official website- www.jacksonparkadvisorycouncil.org
To Obama Presidential Center Jackson Park page www.hydepark.org/parks/jpac/ObamaPLibrary.htm
Jackson Park News and Bulletins in hydepark.org
South Lakefront Plan website including for comments- www.southlakefrontplan.com (Our website will construct a page just about this). Obama Foundation- www.obama.org.
The official website for Section 106 Jackson Park is
https://tinyurl.com/JPImprovements
Email address to make comments to the Inventory, impacts etc.: Department of Planning and Development- Attn. Eleanor Gorski or Abby Monroe (will also be forwarded to CDOT). dpd@cityofchicago.org.

Schedule of meetings and process from January 2018.
About the Section 106 review (The site is https://tinyurl.com/JPImprovements. http also works, or navigate from cityofchicago.org find Planning and Development Department (DPD) and navigate)
Part 1 is the invitation/announcement,
Part 2 is a summary of the full description from the Dec. 1 2017 Kickoff meeting for working group
with draft HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY and WORKING LINKS including to maps
(Summary of comments + official letters after Dec 1 2017 consulting parties kickoff: https://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/dcd/supp_info/jackson-park-improvements.htm.)
The brief report on the December 1 meeting
From the JPAC Newsletters
Various thoughts and comments

Schedule of meetings and process (February meetings are not yet announced as of 2/19)

January/February 2018
Public meeting(s) hosted by CPD in preparation for final steps of the South Lakefront Framework Plan update

Mid-February 2018
Section 106 Historic Properties Inventory Report issued for review by consulting parties and the general public
(includes any changes to the Area of Potential Effect (APE) for architecture or the list of historic resources within the APE boundary)

Mid-February 2018
Public meeting(s) hosted by the Obama Foundation, CDOT, and CPD in preparation for Plan Commission hearing

Late February 2018
Section 106 Consulting Parties Meeting #2
(presentation of Historic Properties Inventory Report and process for evaluation of potential effects)

Late March 2018
Section 106 Consulting Parties Meeting #3
(presentation of effects assessment and initial discussion of mitigation measures)

April 2018
Final South Lakefront Framework Plan update presented to CPD Board

April 2018
Plan Commission Hearing on OPC Planned Development application and the associated OPC, CDOT and CPD Lakefront Protection Ordinance applications

Late April 2018
Section 106 Consulting Parties Meeting #4
(presentation of draft mitigation measures and draft Memorandum of Agreement)

May 2018
City Council Hearing on OPC Planned Development application

May-December 2018
Federal process continues (NEPA and Section 106)

ABOUT - Part 1, the Announcement document sent to the Consulting Party organizations November 2017

Environmental Review of Jackson Park Improvements
Updated Nov. 20, 2017 (December update is the same)

Introduction
The City of Chicago, through the Department of Planning and Development (DPD) and the Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT), is working on several roadway improvement projects in Jackson Park and the Midway Plaisance that will support the Obama Presidential Center (OPC) and the South Lakefront Plan update.

When these projects are completed, they will support a revitalized Jackson Park. Since it was originally designed by renowned landscape architects Olmsted & Vaux in 1871, Jackson Park has undergone multiple transformations in the last one hundred years which have altered the original design, including as the site of the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893.

The Chicago Park District’s South Lakefront Framework Plan (1999) outlined many of the proposed improvements now under consideration. The Park District is engaged in a planning process to update the South Lakefront Framework Plan, specifically for Jackson Park and South Shore Cultural Center. The 2017 Framework Plan update will create a plan for the next ten years to respond to neighborhood needs and historic context, provide a vision for improvements, serve as a planning tool and outline priorities to deliver improvements in a coordinated manner.

Various proposed park projects and accompanying roadway changes within Jackson Park require a federal-level environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) as well as consultation under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. For these purposes, the city will prepare a document known as an “Environmental Assessment” (EA), which will be formally titled “Obama Presidential Center Mobility Improvements to Support the South Lakefront Framework Plan”.

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and National Historic Preservation Act (Section 106)
NEPA and Section 106 are separate – but related – processes. When both are required, they must be completed concurrently, under the direction of a lead federal agency. In this case, the lead agency is the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The City will conduct the review process in conjunction with the Federal agencies.
Purpose of Environmental Review

The purpose of this review is to provide a process for FHWA to work closely with the City of Chicago, the State Historic Preservation Office, other federal and state agencies, and the public to evaluate and, if necessary, mitigate the effects of the projects.
For more information on FHWA’s NEPA process, please visit their website at: www.environment.fhwa.dot.gov/projdev/index.asp

Both NEPA and Section106 require that federal agencies study the impacts of proposed plans on historic sites, buildings, and other cultural resources. Jackson Park is listed on the National Register as part of the Jackson Park and Midway Plaisance Historic Landscape District. The evaluation of potential impacts to historic resources, including Jackson Park, will be an important component of the review process.

Public Participation
Community input will aid the City and Federal agencies in the identification of important cultural landscape features, architectural and ecological resources, and impacts to these resources.
To facilitate these discussions, the City will host community events as we move through the process during 2017 and 2018. All members of the public are invited to attend.

Meeting dates will be posted on this webpage as the project advances. Certain parties, such as the State Historical Preservation Officer and local government representatives, are designated “consulting parties” in the Section 106 process.
Other individuals or organizations may be invited to become consulting parties as well, or they may request consulting party status. More information on the role and designation of a consulting party can be found in the Citizen’s Guide to the Section 106 Process.
More information on the Section 106 process can be found at the following link: www.achp.gov/106summary.html.

Schedule of Events
This schedule will be updated to include public meetings for the South Lakefront Planning process, the Obama Presidential Center and the Federal Review process for Jackson Park as they are announced.
To complete Section 106, the City will host the following Section 106 Task Force meetings

Task Force Meeting #1: Task Force Kick-off Meeting/Overview of Historic Resources
10 a.m. to noon, Friday Dec.1, 2017 South Side YMCA 6330 S. Stony Island Ave.
Task Force Meeting #2: Results of Historic Resources Identification in the Study area and potential effects
Task Force Meeting #3: Effects Assessment and Mitigation Measures
Task Force Meeting #4: Effects Assessment and Mitigation Measures

Section 106 Task Force meetings are intended to be working meetings for cooperating agencies and consulting parties.
Parallel to the Section 106 Task Force meetings, the project team will host two public meetings to discuss additional topics under NEPA and to provide updates on Section 106 Task Force progress. The NEPA process will culminate in a formal public hearing.
The proposed OPC project and proposed roadway improvements will also be vetted by the Chicago Plan Commission and City Council through the required public hearing process.

Additional Resources
Area of Potential Effect – Archaeology Map
This draft map depicts the areas of Jackson Park where historic artifacts may be found underground and will guide the excavation process to confirm.
Area of Potential Effect – Architecture Map
This draft map depicts the boundary around Jackson Park where environmental impacts will be evaluated. The boundary is larger than the park itself to consider any impacts to adjacent properties or properties within the viewshed of the proposed development.
Proposed Improvements to Jackson Park
• Chicago Park District’s South Lakefront Framework Plan Update (SLFP)
• Obama Presidential Center (OPC)

Part 2- Section 106. Process and Documents, Evaluation (summary by Gary Ossewaarde of the handout and presentatation at the Kickoff Working Meeting at South Side YMCA December 1, 2017.
(In quotes are from the notice of review process to consulting parties or materials in the site for this review, https://tinyurl.com/JPImprovements late 2107.) 76 organizations, groups, and institutions/stakeholders were invited to be consulting parties and 40-60 responded or joined later. These have a demonstrated legal or economic interest or concern about historic properties. Locally these include Hyde Park-Kenwood Community Conference, Hyde Park Historical Society, Jackson Park Advisory Council, Jackson Park Watch, Midway Park Advisory Council, and Nichols Park Advisory Council. Note there is a dual public engagement process: Invite-only working meetings of cooperating agencies and the consulting parties and two public meetings and a public hearing on the resultant Environmental Assessment. See also links below.
Where can I submit comments? dpd@cityofchicago.org.
Formal designation for the proposed resultant Environmental Assessment (EA):
Obama Presidential Center Mobility Improvements to Support the South Lakefront Framework Plan.

Purpose of Review: “The purpose of this review is to provide a process for FHWA to work closely with the City of Chicago, the State Historic Preservation Office, other federal and state agencies, and the public to evaluate and, if necessary, mitigate the effects of the projects.

Why is this necessary?
“Various proposed park projects [most notably the Obama Presidential Center] and accompanying roadway changes within Jackson Park [on the National Register of Historic Places] require a federal-level environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) as well as consultation under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.” For these purposes, the city will prepare a document known as an “Environmental Assessment” (EA), which will be formally titled “Obama Presidential Center Mobility Improvements to Support the South Lakefront Framework Plan”.” The review will also inform the revision of the 1999 South Lakefront Framework Plan- a process in progress.

Who and what?
Section 106 review has started. The NEPA Environmental review is to be announced in early 2018. The two must be completed concurrently. Important in the process is evaluation of potential impacts to historic resources, including cultural landscape features, architectural and ecological resources.

The conveners and conductors of the work are the City of Chicago Department of Planning (Eleanor Gorski an Abby Monroe) and Development and Department of Transportation (John Sadler).
The Lead Agency is the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

Links to information on the process:
www.environment.fhwa.dot.gov/projdev/index.asp and
www.achp.gov/106summary.html and http://www.achp.gov/docs/CitizenGuide.pdf.
About the national registry and its conditions for Jackson Park
(Jackson Park and Midway Plaisance Historic Landscape District )-
https://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/cde/supp_info/jackson-park-historic-register.pdf.

The resource maps:
Archeological: https://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/dcd/supp_info/2017-10-18-APE_Archeological_Overall.pdf.
Architectural and Historic structures and features (which covers a “viewshed” from one to several blocks surrounding Jackson, South Shore Cultural Center, and much of the Midway)
https://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/dcd/supp_info/2017-10-27-DRAFT-APE_Historical_Overall.pdf.

The series of Working Meetings of the Cooperating Agencies and the Consulting Parties began with a Kickoff December 1, with which included a power point on the process, a proposed Historic Resources Inventory of Structures and Cultural Resources, and the Historical and Archeological Resources Inventory maps. Many groups submitted comments.

Task Force Working meetings 2-4 had not yet been scheduled- they will cover (2) Results of the Historic Resources Identification Study Area (comments due January 5),

(3 and 4) Effects Assessment and Mitigation Measures.

Two public meetings and the public hearing on the proposed Effects Assessment and Mitigation Measures.

From the Section 106 Consulting Parties Kick off Meeting
OPC Mobility Improvements to Support the South Lakefront Framework Plan
This process does not focus on the golf proposal.
Only the following from a Framework Plan requires federal review-
Roadway improvements due to roadway closures – under Federal Highway Administration
Potential conversion of parkland to non-recreational use under Urban Parks Recreation and Recreation Recovery Program (UPARR) - under National Park Service

National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 requires federal agencies to assess environmental effects prior to making decisions.
Essential elements under NPEA: Purpose and Need, Alternatives, Impacts, Mitigation, Public Involvement, Interagency Coordination, Documentation
Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966
Agencies must take into account the effects on historic properties and
Afford the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation a reasonable opportunity to comment on such undertakings

What are the “undertakings” here?
Roadway improvements with potential federal funding and
The OPC and related Framework Plan improvements (the said potential conversion of parkland to non-recreational use as defined in UPARR.
Section 106 regulations describe the process for identifying historic properties and assess effects and mitigations.

What historic properties? Those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.
Section 106 review is done under NEPA because NEPA oversees Historic Resources (others are Noise, Traffic, Wildlife/Habitat, Air and Water Quality, and Socioeconomics). Under Historic Resources mandate is Section 106, under which are Archeology and Architecture.
NEPA process is led by FHWA in coordination with other federal, state, and local agencies. Chicago DPD and CDOT will facilitate. (Who says so? Advisory Council on Historic preservation – ACHP).)

What are the steps?
Initiate (determine undertaking, coordinate with other reviews, identify consulting parties, develop public input)
Identify resources (through Spring 2018)-
(determine “Area of Potential Effect- APE,
Identify reasonable resources and eligibility and review with consulting parties)
Assess if there are adverse effects (Spring and Summer 2018)
(Apply criteria, review with consulting parties)
Resolve adverse effect if needed (Summer/Fall 2018)
(develop alternatives to avoid, minimize or mitigate) adverse effects and review with consulting parties; develop a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA).
Hold hearing
Proceed with the project.

Parallel: project team host public meetings on added NEPA topics (see above) and provide updates
Establishing the Areas of Potential Effect (APE)
Definition: APE is the geographic area where the project could have an effect on historic resources.
Archaeology. Method of determination- considering areas of disturbance
Architecture. Method of determination-Considering the ful range of efets including diret physca, visual, and audial.
The Archaeological Survey.

The Illinois State Archeological Survey (ISAS) is conducting the survey to identify potential underground historic resources, focusing on locations where there could be potential for ground disturbance. 11/12/17-Spring 2018.
Architecture Scope within Jackson Park and the parts of the Midway (east of the viaduct)including buildings and structures, landscape features, sculpture/art and site furnishings.
Potentially eligible buildings will be researched to provide description, history and development, and National Register eligibility.
Architecture Scope outside Jackson Park and Midway (i.e. west of the viaduct)
Hyde Park Area- majority already included in the Hyde Park-Kenwood National Register District.
Woodlawn Area- Reconnaissance-level survey to identify historic properties.

Criteria. Properties must be 50 years old or older and meet with at least one of the following (to be eligible for National Register listing):
A- associated with events tht have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history or
B- associated with the lives of persons significant in our past or
C- embody distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or that represent the work of a master, or that possess high artistic values, or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction or
D- that have yielded, or may be likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history.
It must possess sufficient integrity to convey its significance.
Properties of exceptional significance but less than 50 years old may also be considered.

Jackson Park. Historic layers and elements that support the Registry designation.
-Original Olmsted and Vaux Plan, 1871
-Olmsted, Codman, Burnham & Root design for the Columbian Exposition, 1893
-Olmsted, Olmsted & Eliot plan to transform the site back to parkland, 1895-97
-Golf course addition (first public course west of Alleghenies), 1899
-Beaches and shore, including granite and two other beaches, 63rd beachouse,1880s-1919
-Fine Arts Pavilion becomes Field Columbian museum then Museum of Science and Industry, 1893-1933
-Paul Douglas Nature Sanctuary created, community gets removal of Nike missile base 60s (-1974)
-Jackson Park and Midway Plaisance listed on National Register, 1972.

Olmsted’s Design Principles
-The Lake with broad views of Lake Michigan from a Shore Drive
-Fields of pastoral landscapes designed for strolling, tennis and croquet, and baseball, with golf added later
-Lagoons that were secluded and provided scenery from shore and boats
-Columbian Museum that added formal architectural design

Currently Identified Historic Features (THE INVENTORY (draft)) for Jackson Park and the Midway-
27: 15 of these are buildings and structures, 6 are bridges, and 4 are monuments. By location, not priority- Working Mtgs are to consider
1. Iowa Building. 1936-40
2. Music Court Comfort Station. 1888, 1936
3. Bowling Green Clubhouse. 1927
4. Music Court Bridge. 1904-6
5. East Bridge (Clarence Darrow). 1880, 1893-5, 1957-63
6. Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago landmark). 1893
7. Perennial Garden. [1936]
8. Cheney-Goode Memorial Bench. 1932
9. 59th Street Viaduct. 1893 (and 1926?)
10. Masaryk Monument. 1955
11. Linne Monument. 1891/1976
12. English Comfort Station (by the track?). 1934
13. Japanese Garden. [1893 predecessor features, evolved from 1930s at least]
14. Shelter/Comfort Station at Driving Range. 1936
15. 59th Street Inlet Bridge. 1895
16. Middle Bridge on Hayes Dr. 1901
17. Southern Shore Yacht Club. 1934
18. Coast Guard life saving Station. 1906
19. Statue of the Republic (Chicago Landmark). 1918
20. Cecil Partee Golf Shelter. 1900 page 5
21. Maintenance Building. 1936
22. Jackson Park Field House. 1957
23. Jackson Park Yacht Club. 1906-30
24. La Rabida Children’s Hospital. 1932
25. Golf Shelter (9th hole at 67th-so. Sh. Dr. -Marquette). 1912
26. South Haven (Animal) Bridge. 1904
27. 63rd Street Beach House (Chicago Landmark). 1919
In addition, the following Landscape Features are listed:
Circulation Roads and Paths. Golf Course. Berms and Sunken Lawn Panels. Historic Walks and Balustrades. Paved Granite Beach. Japanese Garden (also listed above). Perennial Garden (also listed above). and Naturalistic Designs including plantings and waterway systems, lagoons and Islands.

NEXT STEPS
2. IDENTIFY historic resources (through Spring 2018).
Determine Area of Potential Effect (APE)
Reasonable identification of historic resources and eligibility
Review with consulting parties
Then 3 ASSESS adverse effects including criteria and
4 RESOVE any adverse effects-
-alternatives to avoid, minimize or mitigate adverse effects,
-review with consulting partners
Draw up Memorandum of Agreement MOA

How Step 2 (Identify) progresses

- Project team identifies potential historic properties (eligible or listed on NRHP) in the APE
-Team prepare document HISTORIC PROPERTIES INVENTORY REPORT with documentary photos and analysis of historic eligibility.
-Report is reviewed by public and consulting partners, comments collected.
-In consultation with the state SHPO, FWA makes ELIGIBILITY DETERMINATIONS
-All Consulting Parties receive a copy of the Historic Properties inventory Report by email at least a week prior to next meeting.
For meeting 2, consulting parties are asked to come prepared to discuss the HISTORIC PROPERTIES INVENTORY REPORT
Engage in group discussion on the same
Start to assess effects to historic properties.

(End of presentation- see comments given at the meeting, below.)

Brief version of the December 1 2017 meeting

Section 106 historical and archaeological review of park resources and proposal impacts was started and a Task Force kickoff meeting was held December 1. (Watch for a similar, coterminous process for the NEPA Environmental Review to be announced.) See more details in the November minutes (in Dec. Newsletter) and in the extensive power point online at https://tinyurl.com/JPImprovements where comments-- including about specific or missed historical resources in the park can be submitted. Admittance to the small hall was mostly limited to 2 representatives from each the many Consulting Parties, although there was a live-streaming overflow room (not full). The presentation was quite detailed and the floor was opened to many questions about process and specifics and statements, some expressing strong support for or else skepticism about the proposals and/ or their potential effects on the historic features.
Some of the comments: Golf and South Shore Cultural Center footprints have to be in this or have a review- please clarify. The rest of the Midway should be included in the study area. The site has shifted- please study that. Are the costs a potential damage? It’s exciting to see everybody interested in Jackson Park because we think it’s an amazing place- Olmsted would be proud. These reviews cannot be successful without knowing the tree etc. loses, gains and changes. Will the review consider effects of road changes including on access to harbors? The Obama Center will partner with Hyde Park High for a great gain. Jackson Park Highlands survey overwhelmingly supported the Center; I view the Museum building as a beacon of hope and change. It’s good the process is happening but it needs to answer all the questions and deal with all the concerns. If a large set of adverse effects are found, could there be a basis to recommend cancellation/movement elsewhere? (answer- this process does not provide for a go/no go recommendation but requirement to fix found problems before work can co forward). Michal Strautmanis of the Foundation told the Tribune after the meeting, “.. we saw a lot of interest and a lot of excitement. What could be seen as an arcane historic review process… we had people who are interested in the process come participate…. That type of civic engagement is exciting.”

The next steps for the project are to identify historic resources and their eligibility (under criteria) and the “Area of Potential Effect” including an inventory with eligibility determinations, and to review these with the consulting parties. After: to assess found adverse effects (which also have criteria) and review and resolve towards a recommendation, public hearings and Memoranda of Agreement. The next sets of meetings are for the Task Force teams with the consulting parties.

The potential inventory sites to be evaluated in the “Currently Identified Historic Features” includes these 27 structure
1. Iowa Building. 2. Music Court Comfort Station. 3. Bowling Green Clubhouse. 4. Music Court Bridge.
5. East Bridge (Clarence Darrow). 6. Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago landmark). 7. Perennial Garden. 8. Cheney-Goode Memorial Bench. 9. 59th Street Viaduct. 10. Masaryk Monument. 11. Linne Monument. 12. English Comfort Station. 13. Japanese Garden. 14. Shelter/Comfort Station at Driving Range. 15. 59th Street Inlet Bridge. 16. Middle Bridge on Hayes Dr. 17. Southern Shore Yacht Club. 18. Coast Guard Station. 19. Statue of the Republic (Chicago Landmark). 20. Cecil Partee Golf Shelter. 21. Maintenance Building. 22. Jackson Park Field House. 23. Jackson Park Yacht Club. 24. La Rabida Children’s Hospital.
25. Golf Shelter (at Promontory Drive). 26. South Haven (Animal) Bridge. 27. 63rd Street Beach House (Chicago Landmark).
15 of these are buildings and structures, 6 are bridges, and 4 are monuments.
In addition, the following Landscape Features are listed:
Circulation Roads and Paths. Golf Course. Berms and Sunken Lawn Panels. Historic Walks and Balustrades. Paved Granit Beach. Japanese Garden (also listed above), Perennial Garden (also listed above), and Naturalistic Designs including plantings and waterway systems, lagoons and Islands.

From December 2017 JPAC Newsletter - November minutes

Environmental and Section 106 review and surveys of historical/archeological resources/ environmental impacts of proposed projects. Eleanor Gorski of the Chicago Department of Planning described the scope of the work, required by law when funds are to be spent in public spaces that are on the National Register of Historic Places (i.e. Jackson and Midway1972) to assess resources and what might be adversity impacted and need mitigation. The two reviews will be led by the Federal Highway Administration, but a host of federal, state and city agencies including EPA and Illinois Archeological Survey are involved. The Chicago Dept. of Planning and Development, with Transportation (together the “Applicant”) will do the heavy lifting of the survey and the task force that includes a large number of Consulting Party (CP) organizations and groups and the public hearing. JPAC is among nearly 60 participating CPs. The boundary of historic resources extends 1 to several blocks beyond Jackson and South Shore parks and Midway Plaisance east of the railway, areas that are or may be eligible to be in historic districts or the National Register. Foundations of former historic structures on the Obama Center proposed footprint, work-affected roadways and a set of spots throughout the park will be bored and probed at the 6’, 12’ and 24’ levels. The physical work (started) is expected to take at least several months. Task Force kickoff invite meeting is December 1. Visit https://tinyurl.com/JPImprovements where reports and meetings will posted and comments taken. Members said they welcome not only the review itself and the chance for the public to weigh in on a new set of matters but also the opportunity to learn more of the park’s great past, many incarnations, and design principles.

From December 2017 JPAC Newsletter - news p 4

Section 106 historical and archaeological review of park resources and proposal impacts was started and a Task Force kickoff meeting was held December 1. (Watch for a similar, coterminous process for the NEPA Environmental Review to be announced.) See more details in the November minutes above and in the extensive power point online at https://tinyurl.com/JPImprovements where comments-- including about specific or missed historical resources in the park can be submitted. [This is not current- submit to dpd@cityofchicago.org.] Admittance to the small hall was mostly limited to 2 representatives from each the many Consulting Parties, although there was a live-streaming overflow room (not full). The presentation was quite detailed and the floor was opened to many questions about process and specifics and statements, some expressing strong support for or else skepticism about the proposals and/ or their potential effects on the historic features.

Some of the comments: Golf and South Shore Cultural Center footprints have to be in this or have a review- please clarify. The rest of the Midway should be included in the study area. The site has shifted- please study that. Are the costs a potential damage? It’s exciting to see everybody interested in Jackson Park because we think it’s an amazing place- Olmsted would be proud. These reviews cannot be successful without knowing the tree etc. loses, gains and changes. Will the review consider effects of road changes including on access to harbors? The Obama Center will partner with Hyde Park High for a great gain. Jackson Park Highlands survey overwhelmingly supported the Center; I view the Museum building as a beacon of hope and change. It’s good the process is happening but it needs to answer all the questions and deal with all the concerns. If a large set of adverse effects are found, could there be a basis to recommend cancellation/movement elsewhere? (answer- this process does not provide for a go/no go recommendation but requirement to fix found problems before work can co forward). Michal Strautmanis of the Foundation told the Tribune after the meeting, “.. we saw a lot of interest and a lot of excitement. What could be seen as an arcane historic review process… we had people who are interested in the process come participate…. That type of civic engagement is exciting.”

The next steps for the project are for the project with Task Force to identify historic resources and their eligibility (under criteria) and the “Area of Potential Effect” including an inventory with eligibility determinations, and to review these with the consulting parties. After: assess any found adverse effects (which also have criteria) and review and resolve towards a recommendation, public hearings and Memoranda of Agreement.

One person's stabs at comments. (See also comments at the December 1 meeting- above)
By Gary Ossewaarde

Section 106 Comment at dpd@cityofchicago.org.
Attn: Eleanor Gorski or Abby Monroe, Chicago Dept. of Planning and Development.

By Gary Ossewaarde, Jackson Park Advisory Council Secretary, garyossewaarde@yahoo.com.
I am presenting the following as mine, not official communication of JPAC. If they should be in another format or sent to another place, please let me know.
Comments on the Historic Properties Inventory Report.
I have not received the report so can only comment on what was in the Kickoff meeting document.

Darrow Bridge is listed as a historic feature. It is on the National Register (as part of the whole park, not in itself, apparently?) It is not listed as having City Landmark Designation, but it is said it is included as subsidiary to the Museum designation- is that true, and when was the Museum declared a Chicago Landmark? It would seem not to be effected except that the coming of the OPC and replacement of Cornell Drive with new paths to create a “campus” with MSI would be encouragement to replace/restore the bridge.

I presume the final Report will prioritize the features. Will Chicago Landmark Designation have any role in priorities?

Were no features more recent than 50 years considered potentially eligible? If so but not deemed special enough to be included, they should be noted if excluded just because of the year of building, since they may be eligible later-- caution should be given regarding changes to them.

How much does listing as eligible preclude changes, and what kinds and degree of changes to them, especially if no impact from the project is considered likely? Example: some scenarios for the Framework Plan suggest moving monuments or structures such as the Statue of the Republic. I think moving of the Cheney-Goode monument to greater prominence and recognition as part of a Women’s History Square would be much to the good whether there is any garage for OPC on the east end of the Midway or not.
Likewise, some could be repurposed and so have interior changes- example the former Coast Guard Station. Other structures such as Darrow Bridge may have to accommodate modern bridge codes.

Among features that, unless OPC designs are changed, will definitely be greatly altered is the Perennial Garden. Is the new design precluded if the current garden concept is considered an eligible priority?

Certain historic landscape and circulation features are only implicitly mentioned, but I think merit consideration in their own right—the Music Court and the “hill” and fortress where the original WCE La Rabida monastery replica stood and the reproduction Columbus ships were mored, at the end of Promontory Drive circle. Possibly also the historic “Jewish” beach on the Silurian reef shore east of La Rabida (the reef itself is still there).

I do not consider the current Cornell highway to be an historic road, but it was a country park road under Olmsted’s plans so even if removed and converted to bike and pedestrian use and not just softened, the replacement should approximate the original alignment and be plain as a park arterial path.

As to effects of the OPC on historic features. First, OPC structures and that fortunately are not on top of underground features (mainly WCE structure foundations) but they seem to directly abut- excavation work mitigation such as coffering may be necessary. This includes the Perennial Garden if that is ultimately to be altered, and possibly to-be-vacated east Midway Plaisance Drive.
The only off site historic feature in Jackson Park that it seems to me might be affected is the Statue of the Republic depending on changes to Hayes Drive/Richards intersection due to the OPC needs.

Will golf consolidation likely need a separate assessment?

Tree replacement including of some clusters will be a major consequence of OPC the work as well as removal of Cornell Drive and adding lanes to stony Island and turning radii etc on Hayes and on Lake Shore Drive- presumably that will be considered under landscape as well as later in the environmental survey.


###